Trade

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From regulation of online platforms to digital economic agreements: A state of play

Since January 2020, the IFCCD has partnered with the Groupe de recherche sur l’intégration continentale, attached to the Centre d’études sur l’intégration et la mondialisation (CEIM) of the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), to produce an international watch on culture and e-commerce.

The February report firstly emphasizes the Digital Economic Agreements promoted by Singapore, as well as the perspectives of the enlargement of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Secondly, it turns to several initiatives taken by public authorities in order to impose new regulations for online platforms. The focus will be on South Africa, Kenya, Indonesia, Australia, South Korea, France, and the European Union (EU).

READ THE REPORT

Online platforms and trade agreements in Asia: cultural and regulation issues

Since January 2020, the IFCCD has partnered with the Groupe de recherche sur l’intégration continentale, attached to the Centre d’études sur l’intégration et la mondialisation (CEIM) of the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), to produce an international watch on culture and e-commerce.

The December report firstly focuses on the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership signed by China, Japan and 13 other countries in Asia and Pacific. Secondly, it analyses the initiatives taken by Indian government in order to impose new regulations for online platforms. Thirdly, it highlights the new guidelines that China intends to adopt seeking to curb the power of its biggest Internet companies. Finally, the report deals with Disney Plus and its launch in Latin America.

READ THE REPORT

Ensuring level playing field in the digital market: a cross-national issue

Since January 2020, the IFCCD has partnered with the Groupe de recherche sur l’intégration continentale, attached to the Centre d’études sur l’intégration et la mondialisation (CEIM) of the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), to produce an international watch on culture and e-commerce.

The October report comes back to the discussions around the new Australian code of conduct for online platforms, focusing on various concerns expressed by online platforms. In addition, it analyzes the political confrontation between global online platforms, public authorities and content creators in other national contexts. Moreover, it highlights both the talks within the European Union (EU) and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) with respect to the digital services tax and the ongoing bilateral negotiations between the United States and the United Kingdom.  

READ THE OCTOBER REPORT

 

2005 UNESCO Convention on the Diversity of Cultural Expressions: a tool for the Latin American cultural sector

The International Federation of Coalitions for the Diversity of Cultural Expressions is organizing a training program* in Latin America on the 2005 Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions.

*The training will be held in Spanish.

The International Federation of Coalitions for Cultural Diversity (IFCCD), the German Commission for UNESCO, Creatividad y Cultura Glocal, the U40 Network and the Chilean and Paraguayan Coalitions for Cultural Diversity

INVITE

Artists, creators, independent producers, distributors, broadcasters and publishers in the book, film, television, music, performing and visual arts sectors, cultural professionals from the public and private sectors and civil society organizations in Latin America to participate in the Spanish language training program

“2005 UNESCO Convention for the Diversity of Cultural Expressions: a tool for the Latin American cultural sector”

from 6 to 28 November 2020.

The program aims to mobilize cultural networks in Latin America and to reach people who are already doing the work of the 2005 UNESCO Convention in their local area but may not be aware of it. The aim is to give them opportunities to expand their networks at the national and regional levels, to provide a better understanding of the tools they have at their disposal to defend and promote Latin American cultural expressions and their diversity, to increase the visibility and reach of the IFCCD in Latin America, and to bring the Convention closer to professionals in the public, private or civil society sectors who are already working in or want to work in the cultural sector.

REGISTRATION AND SELECTION :

– The program is free and the number of places is limited.
– You can register online: https://bit.ly/3cPYT0W
– The deadline for receipt of applications is October 23, 2020.
– Selected participants will be notified by e-mail on October 30.

PROGRAM FORMAT :

This online training consists of eight sessions in November. The duration of each session is 2 hours, for a total of 16 hours for the program. 

PROGRAM AND TERMS

EVENT PAGE IN SPANISH

Global struggle for digital tax and level playing field

Since January 2020, the IFCCD has partnered with the Groupe de recherche sur l’intégration continentale, attached to the Centre d’études sur l’intégration et la mondialisation (CEIM) of the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), to produce an international watch on culture and e-commerce.

The September report focuses on six interrelated issues: (1) the discussions around the new Australian code of conduct for online platforms; (2) the discussions in Europe related to the dominant position of Google and Facebook; (3) the political confrontation between the US administration and several national governments regarding the adoption of digital services taxes; (4) the Digital Economy Agreement between Australia and Singapore, as well as (5) the trade negotiations between Japan and the United Kingdom. (6) Finally, Jérôme Pacouret, researcher at the University of Quebec in Montreal, provides an analysis regarding Brexit and the perspectives from British cultural actors, focusing on copyright and the Creative Europe program.

READ THE REPORT

Governing global digital trade in the age of the COVID-19 pandemic

Since January 2020, the IFCCD has partnered with the Groupe de recherche sur l’intégration continentale, attached to the Centre d’études sur l’intégration et la mondialisation (CEIM) of the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), to produce an international watch on culture and e-commerce.

The sixth edition focuses on six interrelated international issues: (1) the plurilateral negotiations on electronic commerce; (2) the efforts of powerful business associations to promote new digital trade rules; (3) the political confrontation between the US administration and several national governments regarding the adoption of digital services taxes; (4) the multilateral negotiations on digital taxation; (5) the Digital Economy Partnership Agreement between New Zealand, Chile and Singapore, as well as (6) the trade negotiations between the US and the UK.

READ THE SIXTH EDITION

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Global online platforms, the winning actors of the great lockdown? The case of the music industry

Since January 2020, the IFCCD has partnered with the Groupe de recherche sur l’intégration continentale, attached to the Centre d’études sur l’intégration et la mondialisation (CEIM) of the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), to produce an international watch on culture and e-commerce.

The fifth edition analyzes the effects of the great lockdown on the strategies of global online platforms in the music industry.

READ THE FIFTH EDITION

Videos of the 6th IFCCD Congress

The 6th IFCCD Congress was held in Lomé, Togo, from October 9 to 11, 2019.

It was divided into a pan-African conference and a general assembly of the International Federation of Coalitions for Cultural Diversity (IFCCD), and brought together 85 participants from 28 countries, including 16 African countries, for three days.

The speakers presented their actions and discussed pan-African and international issues in seven panels, each of which was the subject of an online summary.

Read the reports

 

Panel videos can be viewed online:

Opening Day 1 

 

 

 

 

Panel 1 : The implementation of the 2005 Convention in the African region

>>> Read the article : The implementation of the 2005 Convention in the African region

 

 

Panel 2 : Public policies for culture

>>> Read the article : Public policies for culture

 

 

 

Panel 3 : Civil society participation in public policy development

>>> Read the article : Civil society participation in public policy development

 

 

 

Panel 4 : Addressing the major challenges for the diversity of cultural expressions

>>> Read the article : Addressing the major challenges for the diversity of cultural expressions

 

 

Opening Day 2

 

 

 

 

Panel 5 : Civil society challenges elsewhere in the world

>>> Read the article : Civil society challenges elsewhere in the world

 

 

 

Panels 6 and 7 : The challenges for cultural diversity on the Internet / Facing the challenges of the future through innovation

>>> Read the article : The new realities of the globalized market for the dissemination of digital cultural content and the challenges for cultural diversity on the Internet

>>> Read the article : Facing the challenges of the future through innovation

 

With the support of the International Organisation of La Francophonie, the Union Économique et Monétaire Ouest Africaine (UEMOA), the Togolese Coalition for Cultural Diversity, the French Coalition for Cultural Diversity, the Coalition for the Diversity of Cultural Expressions (Canada), the Austrian Coalition for Cultural Diversity, the Government of Togo, the Government of Canada, the Government of Quebec, the National Commission of the Francophonie in Togo.

 

 

Online platforms and culture: the winning actors of the great lockdown?

Since January 2020, the IFCCD has partnered with the Groupe de recherche sur l’intégration continentale, attached to the Centre d’études sur l’intégration et la mondialisation (CEIM) of the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), to produce an international watch on culture and e-commerce.

The fourth edition examines how the great lockdown has increased the power of video-on-demand platforms in the global cultural market.

READ THE FOURTH EDITION

Protecting culture in trade agreements

The International Federation of Coalitions for Cultural Diversity (IFCCD) produced a series of videos on the protection of culture in trade agreements.

The videos cover the history of cultural protection in free trade agreements, the challenge of the national treatment clause, the content and scope of the 2005 UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions, the role of civil society and the issue of digital trade. These short videos (between 2 and 7 minutes each) are based on longer interviews with three experts on these issues:

  • Solange Drouin, Co-Chair of the Coalition for the Diversity of Cultural Expressions, Vice-President, Public Affairs, and Chief Executive of ADISQ,
  • Véronique Guèvremont, Professor at the Faculty of Law of Université Laval, Quebec (Canada), and holder of the UNESCO Chair on the Diversity of Cultural Expressions,
  • Peter Grant, Senior Counsel and past Chair of the Technology, Communications and Intellectual Property Group at McCarthy Tétrault.

History

National Treatment Clause

The 2005 UNESCO Convention

The role of civil society

The challenge of digital trade

 

See long versions

INTERVIEW WITH S. DROUIN (in French)

INTERVIEW WITH V. GUÈVREMONT (in French)

INTERVIEW WITH P. GRANT

 

 

Global trade facing neo-mercantilism: cultural issues

Since January 2020, the IFCCD has partnered with the Groupe de recherche sur l’intégration continentale, attached to the Centre d’études sur l’intégration et la mondialisation (CEIM) of the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), to produce an international watch on culture and e-commerce.

The third edition focuses on the place of culture in the European Union’s new economic partnerships.

READ THE THIRD EDITION

From WTO negotiations on e-commerce to African free trade area: A state of play

Since January 2020, the IFCCD has partnered with the Groupe de recherche sur l’intégration continentale, attached to the Centre d’études sur l’intégration et la mondialisation (CEIM) of the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), to produce an international watch on culture and e-commerce.

The second edition of this watch deals with plurilateral negotiations on e-commerce and looks in particular at the African Continental Free Trade Area.

READ THE SECOND EDITION

The review of audiovisual policy in Europe : Betweeen cultural sovereignty and digital globalisation

Since January 2020, the IFCCD has partnered with the Groupe de recherche sur l’intégration continentale, attached to the Centre d’études sur l’intégration et la mondialisation (CEIM) of the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), to produce an international watch on culture and e-commerce.

The first edition of this watch deals with the reform of the European Union’s audiovisual policy.

READ THE FIRST EDITION

IFCCD provides international watch on digital culture and trade

The protection and promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions in trade agreements and international fora is one of the priorities of the IFCCD. The proliferation of trade agreements at the international level makes it difficult to monitor trends and variations across geographical areas. More and more agreements include chapters on electronic commerce and some countries such as the United States are pushing for the inclusion of clauses preventing discrimination in favour of domestic cultural content. To maintain its expertise on the subject, the IFCCD has decided to partner with researchers from the Groupe de recherche sur l’intégration continentale, part of the Centre d’études sur l’intégration et la mondialisation (CEIM) at the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). A watch on trade agreements in all regions of the world has been set up, which will result in monthly publications available online and included in the IFCCD newsletter.

Addressing the major challenges for the diversity of cultural expressions

The fourth panel of the Regional Conference “Pan-African Perspectives for the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions” (October 9 and 10, 2019) focused on the current and future challenges for the diversity of cultural expressions. It brought together Samuel Sangwa (CISAC), Ivana Otasevic (UNESCO Chair on the Diversity of Cultural Expressions), Edith Katiji (Zimbabwe Musicians’ Union), Luc Yatchokeu (REPAC).

He first recalled the role of copyright collecting societies in remunerating and recognizing creators, and then presented CISAC and its work in Africa. With 37 copyright societies in 31 countries, CISAC is present throughout the continent, from Algeria to South Africa and Togo. CISAC produces an annual global collection report each year. In 2017, out of €9 billion raised worldwide, Africa’s share was only 75 million, or 0.8% of the total. Samuel Sangwa deplored the fact that African creators are not remunerated at the level of the exploitation of their works. He listed the major challenges to the growth of clinics in Africa:

  1. The resistance of users: lack of knowledge of copyright, deliberate refusal of the principle of payment of the fee;
  2. The operational efficiency of collective management organizations: licensing of users, territorial networking, management of digital exploitation rights;
  3. The obsolete, inadequate or inadequate legislative frameworks.

He also pointed out that only eight African countries are now able to collect the private copying levy. Samuel Sangwa then listed the challenges and priority campaigns for CISAC:

  1. The transfer of value on platforms;
  2. The resale right for creators of artistic works (visual arts and crafts);
  3. The right to fair remuneration for authors of audiovisual works

He presented the “Copyright Friendly” label, launched in Cape Verde, which can be awarded to festivals, organizations and events that respect copyright. Finally, he argued that the notion of copyright has always been part of African culture and called for respect for the rights of creators, in Africa as elsewhere in the world.

Presentation by Mr Sangwa (in French)

  • In a second presentation, Ivana Otasevic, coordinator of the UNESCO Chair on the Diversity of Cultural Expressions, presented the Guide on Cultural Clauses in Trade Agreements, by Véronique Guèvremont (Chairholder) and Ivan Bernier (Professor Emeritus of the Faculty of Law of Laval University).

The Chair’s guide meets several objectives:

  1. Raise awareness among States about the possible implications of trade negotiations for the culture sector;
  2. Assist States in developing their capacities so that they can choose the appropriate cultural clauses to preserve their sovereign right to intervene in favour of culture;
  3. Present the best practices that have been developed by some States over the past 15 years;
  4. Inspire new initiatives to protect and promote cultural diversity in trade agreements (particularly in the area of digital trade).

This guide offers an approach inspired by State practice. It is based on a comparative study of 99 free trade agreements concluded since the adoption of the 2005 Convention. The Chair identified the most relevant cultural clauses in these agreements and made recommendations. The guide is structured in four steps. First, it invites States (and civil society organizations that use the guide to lobby their States) to become familiar with their own cultural sector, to understand the mechanisms of free trade and their potential impact on the cultural sector, and to develop a knowledge of existing cultural clauses and trade instruments. In a second step, the guide makes recommendations concerning the preparation for the negotiation of a new trade agreement containing cultural clauses. Thirdly, it gives indications on the main chapters of the agreement for the incorporation of cultural clauses. It highlights the importance of defining exactly what we want to protect and paying particular attention to electronic commerce. The last step of the guide concerns the monitoring of the negotiated free trade agreement and the implementation of cultural clauses.

Presentation by Mrs Otasevic (in French)

  • Édith Katiji, President of the Zimbabwe Musicians’ Union, then addressed a third major challenge for the diversity of cultural expressions: that of women’s participation and conditions in the cultural sector.

Three main things affect women in the cultural spheres:

  1. The defined, imposed and expected roles of women;
  2. A work environment that is often dangerous for them;
  3. Their exclusion from participation in the cultural economy.

Édith Katiji was a member of an all-women music group that performed throughout Zimbabwe. She noted many prejudices about their performance. Some expected them to play one type of music and not another, reserved for men, others had similar expectations regarding the lyrics. There were also prejudices related to their presence on stage, many expected them to dance in a way that was considered “feminine”.

Edith Katiji then referred to the many cases of women facing all kinds of abuse – emotional, physical, sexual – in the workplace. She deplored cases of discrimination, sexist attitudes and general contempt that discourage women from continuing to work in the cultural sector. Women are easily victims of sexist behaviour and even sexual exploitation. Sexual favours may be required from artists in exchange for a promotion or exhibition of their work. The cultural and creative industries are most often led by men and most decisions are therefore made exclusively by them. This creates a situation where women are excluded from any advantageous decisions.

Moreover, much of the exclusion of women does not occur in the open. Men may decide that female interpreters have no place in a particular event. In other cases, they consider that the type of audience expected is not suitable for a female performer. Some male promoters may also consider that the type of music played by a woman is unsuitable for certain audiences. Faced with these obstacles, women often turn to private organizations to perform. But there is little public attention paid to private events and women are therefore most often excluded from the media space. Without this media coverage, they are less visible and earn less. Some use social media to promote themselves, but this does not have the same impact because traditional media are still dominant on the continent (in Zimbabwe, radio is the first broadcasting channel).

Edith Katiji concluded her presentation by calling on African societies to review their history and consider how to achieve gender balance in the cultural sector and in all spheres of society.

Presentation by Mrs Katiji

  • Luc Yatchokeu, coordinator of the Regroupement des Professionnels des Arts et Culture d’Afrique Centrale (REPAC), presented the Art Connect Africa project.

A platform for cultural cooperation and exchange, Art Connect Africa (www.artconnectafrica.com) was designed to encourage and develop cultural relations between North Africa and sub-Saharan Africa. At the origin of the project, there is a desire on the part of cultural actors in North Africa and sub-Saharan Africa to get closer and strengthen exchanges between the two regions. Cultural actors are concerned to present through the arts a united Africa, which a few years ago appeared as two different continents.

The platform brings together several different actors: artists, professionals, festivals, professional organizations, places of cultural expression, media, cultural institutions. It concerns all artistic disciplines: music, performing arts, visual arts, sculpture, literature, cinema, architecture. Luc Yatchokeu reviewed how the project was developed with, on the one hand, the creation of a digital platform (website and application), and, on the other hand, the establishment and animation of a pan-African programme to support cooperation and exchange initiatives.

The expected results are diverse: building an artistic community, sharing information on ongoing collaborations and opportunities, supporting projects, producing statistics, strengthening cooperation and exchanges, exploring new markets.

Presentation by Mr Yatchokeu (in French)

 

With the support of the International Organisation of La Francophonie, the Union Économique et Monétaire Ouest Africaine (UEMOA), the Togolese Coalition for Cultural Diversity, the French Coalition for Cultural Diversity, the Coalition for the Diversity of Cultural Expressions (Canada), the Austrian Coalition for Cultural Diversity, the Government of Togo, the Government of Canada, the Government of Quebec, the National Commission of the Francophonie in Togo.

 

 

Civil society participation in public policy development

The third panel of the Regional Conference “Pan-African Perspectives for the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions” (9 and 10 October 2019) focused on the participation of civil society in the development of public policies in Africa. It brought together Annie Ngo Njock Njock Njock (CODEC), Mohamed Diakité (Malian Coalition for Cultural Diversity), Josh Nyapimbi (Nhimbe Trust), Malik Chaoui (GTPCA), Daves Guzha (Arterial Network).

Their analysis was based on a questionnaire submitted in both countries to civil society cultural organizations. On the basis of the replies to this questionnaire, some meetings, and a review of existing documentation on this subject (in particular, in Mali, the framework document defining the country’s cultural policy), Annie Ngo Njock Njock and Mohamed Diakité showed that, in both countries, there is a real involvement of civil society in the adoption of cultural policies. However, this involvement is still low and could be much higher. There are many expectations on the part of civil society actors towards the government for better consideration of their concerns and better involvement in public policy making processes. There is a general impression that initiatives in favour of culture most often remain at the level of actors, locally, but that they have difficulty accessing the political level.

– In Mali, cultural policy is multiannual and the Ministry of Culture opted for a participatory approach. The contribution of cultural actors has been taken into account. However, some actors are more involved than others.

– In Cameroon, there is a special allocation account to support the arts and culture sector, but this remains insufficient (out of a budget of 4 billion CFA francs for culture, only 1 billion goes to artists and professionals in the sector). There are also laws, implementing decrees, copyright collective societies, but the latter often have funding and management problems. 

Presentation by Mrs Ngo Njock Njock and Mr Diakité (in French)

  • Josh Nyapimbi, Director General of the Nhimbe Trust, then shared his experience and thoughts on the drafting of the quadrennial periodic reports on the implementation of UNESCO’s Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions.

It is not always easy to implement the 2005 Convention in some countries; nor is it easy to report on what has been implemented. This was explained by Josh Nyapimbi in his presentation, which focused on the challenges of writing the quadrennial reports provided by countries. Several difficulties are to be noted:

  1. There is a governance problem in some countries with a lack of civil society trust in governments and vice versa. There is also a division between Western and non-Western countries, both politically and economically. The money available to African civil society often comes from external aid, which is not the case in other parts of the world.
  2. It is difficult to assess the exchange of cultural goods and services in the absence of data. Data is the new global gold and is increasingly being privatized. In the absence of publicly available data, it will no longer be possible to have a realistic picture of what is happening in the field.
  3. The integration of culture into sustainable development objectives is an important issue. The challenge of climate change is central, but not all members of civil society have the same priorities in this area. Again, there are differences between regions.
  4. The promotion of human rights and freedoms is also a major challenge. We must account for what is happening in terms of artistic freedom. But this is not always easy because critical issues are censored by states.

Josh Nyapimbi said he was in favour of a “shadow report”. He explained that the reports submitted to UNESCO are far from reflecting reality and that it would therefore be essential to have a report on what is actually happening in the countries.

*In the Lomé Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions, participants at the regional conference, and in particular organizations from countries of the South, called for the need to prepare alternative reports.

Almost sixty years after its independence, Algeria still does not have a cultural policy. The members of the GTPCA decided to fill this gap by drafting a policy themselves. Taking into consideration all the dimensions related to the cultural sector, some 100 artists, writers, cultural activists, journalists and students undertook a consultation process in 2011, which led to the publication in 2013 of a “Cultural Policy for Algeria”, published online on the GTPCA website. Consisting of clear principles and concrete recommendations, this e-participatory project aims to provide Algeria with a policy that will allow the development of the arts and culture.

Malik Chaoui also mentioned other activities of the GTPCA:

  1. Six training workshops that were organized to strengthen the capacities and skills of cultural actors;
  2. The next Forum on Culture, which will make it possible to make a precise assessment of the Algerian cultural sector and will give rise to a report by the GTPCA;
  3. The creation of a cultural map of Algeria (www.culturemap-dz.org) launched in 2015 to identify the places, links and resources available, promote local talents, enable networking of actors and facilitate their mobility. The database of this platform is continuously updated and each person can register and share information freely.

Malik Chaoui then spoke about the cultural context in Algeria. The culture budget fell by 8% between 2017 and 2018, from the equivalent of $145 million in 2017 to $132.7 million in 2018. The sector has lost 70% of its public funding in recent years. The 2005 Convention was not ratified until 2015. Since February 2019, the country has experienced major demonstrations against corruption. There is a real call for cultural renewal and a willingness to have a new cultural policy.

Presentation by Mr Chaoui (in French)

  • Daves Guzha, President of Arterial Network, presented Arterial’s experience with the African Union and the case of the African Continental Free Trade Agreement.

An Action Plan on Cultural and Creative Industries in Africa was adopted in Dakar in 1992 and updated in 2008. In October 2018, Arterial Network was approached by the African Union to update this action plan for the creative industries. The objective is to align this action plan with the challenges of the 21st century (copyright, digital issues, etc.). This plan is supposed to be a roadmap for civil society, but Daves Guzha found that of all the organizations present at the Congress, only two have heard of its existence. In January 2019, many requests were sent to individual African countries for data; most countries provided these data but others never responded. This roadmap will define priorities for the next ten years and Daves Guzha deplored the lack of response from some countries. From November 6 to 9, 2019, the Arterial Network team will meet to finalize this action plan. The document will then be shared with all governments and submitted for adoption in February 2020, at the 13th session of the Intergovernmental Committee for the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions. Daves Guzha explained that this plan was developed by cultural professionals who conducted a broad analysis. He welcomed the fact that, for the first time, Arterial Network had succeeded in establishing a link between civil society and the African Union.

Daves Guzha then spoke about the African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) that was negotiated by the African Union. It entered into force in May 2019 and defines the African Continental Free Trade Area. Two months ago, artists and creators met in Kigali. There is a willingness on the part of some groups to accelerate the implementation of the agreement in relation to the technology and creativity sectors. Arterial Network will launch a call in the coming weeks to analyse the trade agreement. In each region (five in total) an expert will examine the clauses of the agreement and the issues it raises. When asked about the cultural exemption clauses and the scope of the agreement on the diversity of cultural expressions, Daves Guzha said he would share information and contextualization with the IFCCD secretariat.

Arterial Network is also working with the African Union on Africa Day on May 20. Several artists will be invited by Arterial and the African Union on this occasion. Daves Guzha also presented Artwatch Africa, another Arterial Network project that will be launched on November 25, 2019. This is a new approach that aims to encourage dialogue between artists and with those who develop cultural policies.

 

With the support of the International Organisation of La Francophonie, the Union Économique et Monétaire Ouest Africaine (UEMOA), the Togolese Coalition for Cultural Diversity, the French Coalition for Cultural Diversity, the Coalition for the Diversity of Cultural Expressions (Canada), the Austrian Coalition for Cultural Diversity, the Government of Togo, the Government of Canada, the Government of Quebec, the National Commission of the Francophonie in Togo.

 

 

Congress Participation Grants: Call for applications

The International Federation of Coalitions for Cultural Diversity (IFCCD) offers a limited number of grants to attend the IFCCD Congress.

Two categories of grants are available:

  • One grant to attend the regional conference (October 9 and 10);
  • One grant to attend the IFCCD Regional Conference and General Assembly (October 9, 10 and 11) reserved for IFCCD members in good standing.

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA (FOR GRANTS ONLY)

  • Be a member of a national coalition for cultural diversity (all regions of the world);
  • Be a representative of an organization that has joined the Federation as an associate member (new memberships in preparation for the convention will be considered) (all regions of the world)
  • Be an observer representing an organization of cultural professionals in Africa;
  • Understand English or French, the two languages of the congress, or have the possibility of being accompanied by an interpreter. The secretariat will try, as far as possible, to help participants to contact local interpreters, but will not be able to cover the costs.

APPLICATION DOCUMENTS

  • A curriculum vitae;
  • A two-page cover letter with the following information:
    • Your most relevant professional experiences;
    • Your action within the national coalition for cultural diversity and/or the cultural community;
    • What motivates your participation in the IFCCD congress (relevance to your activity, perspectives for action at the end of the congress);
    • A short file presenting the organization represented and summarizing its activities. The objective of demonstrating that the organization is taking action, even if modest, in the cultural sector (short description of the organization’s activities, recent activity report, publications, links to the website, Facebook page or other social networks, programs or publications related to an organized event, etc.). For observers, any other document attesting to your involvement in promoting the diversity of cultural expressions;
    • Letter of support from the national coalition for cultural diversity or the professional association represented.

FURTHER INFORMATION

  • Possession or possibility of obtaining a valid visa for Togo: note that all expenses advanced for obtaining a visa must be approved in advance by the secretariat, otherwise they cannot be reimbursed. In all cases, a supporting document must be presented to obtain reimbursement of all expenses advanced;
  • If an invitation letter is required, mention it.

SELECTION CRITERIA

  • Diversity of geographical origin;
  • Gender diversity;
  • Experience and anchoring of the candidate;
  • Mission and realization of the represented organization;
  • Intergenerational diversity.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT PROVIDED

  • Cost of international transport
  • Accommodation
  • Per Diem for the duration of the stay
  • Cost of the visa

* According to the dates planned in each scholarship category.

** Extension of travel dates will be possible, but the cost of accommodation beyond the activity will be at the participant’s expense.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING YOUR APPLICATION

Tuesday, June 18, 2019 at midnight, Montreal time

Applications should be sent in English, French or Spanish, the three languages spoken by the IFCCD secretariat, by e-mail to coalition@cdc-ccd.org

Subject of the email: IFCCD Montreal Convention Application + name of your organization.

FOR YOUR INFORMATION

Céline de Dianous: cdedianous@cdc-ccd.org

With the support of the  International Organisation of La Francophonie and the Union Économique et Monétaire Ouest Africaine (UEMOA).

Presentation of the 6th IFCCD Congress

The 6th IFCCD Congress in Lomé, Togo, will consist of a pan-African conference and a general assembly of the International Federation of Coalitions for Cultural Diversity.

This congress will allow:

  • To provide African cultural associations with a forum for analysis, foresight, dialogue and proposals for the development and implementation of cultural policies;
  • To raise awareness of the UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions, the role of the main active international organizations, such as the International Organization of la Francophonie (OIF), current challenges for the implementation of the Convention, as well as some innovations from civil society;
  • To increase the participation of African civil society in the implementation of the UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions;
  • To promote the participation of African civil society in the IFCCD and thus contribute to a better recognition of the plural reality of the diversity of cultural expressions at the global level, as well as to a better representation of the IFCCD;
  • To renew the IFCCD Board of Directors and establish the main orientations of the organization for the period 2019-2023.

Regional Conference: Pan-African Perspectives for Policies that Protect and Promote the Diversity of Cultural Expressions

The consultation with African IFCCD members identified the main objective of this conference, which will be to support the role of civil society organizations on the African continent in the implementation of the 2005 Convention, one of the main conditions of which is the adoption of cultural policies.

The conference will focus on the implementation of the Convention in the African region, advances in cultural policies, either at the national or regional level, emerging issues of the diversity of cultural expressions, innovations implemented to address current and future challenges, and the role of civil society.

This one-and-a-half day conference will be followed by the IFCCD General Assembly, which will provide the opportunity for a roundtable discussion with African and non-African representatives to highlight best practices in terms of public policy development. About fifty participants and guests are expected for this conference.

READ THE PROGRAM

IFCCD General Assembly

This activity will be open to regular or associate members of the IFCCD. As several policy discussions took place at the Montreal conference, the aim will be to confirm these orientations, address short-term actions, administrative issues and renew the IFCCD Board. The meeting will take place over two half-days and is expected to be attended by approximately 30 people.

With the support of the International Organisation of La Francophonie, the Union Économique et Monétaire Ouest Africaine (UEMOA), the Ministère de la Culture et des Communications of the Government of Quebec, the French Coalition for Cultural Diversity, the Togolese Coalition for Cultural Diversity, the Coalition for the Diversity of Cultural Expressions (Canada), the Government of Togo, the Government of Canada, the Délégation générale du Québec à Dakar, the Austrian Coalition for Cultural Diversity.

Become a member of the IFCCD and attend its next Congress

If you are a member of a cultural organization, you can join the IFCCD as an associate
member. You can also join with other organizations to form a national coalition. Each person
can also provide individual support to the cause we are defending.

The next IFCCD Congress will be held from 9 to 11 October 2019 in Lomé, Togo. The congress
will be the occasion for a regional meeting to support dialogue between cultural actors at the
African level and to implement actions that respond to the continent’s challenges. We invite
all cultural actors to participate.

Send us an email if you would like to become a member and attend the Congress:
coalition@cdc-ccd.org

MORE INFORMATION

Job offer: Video maker

Audiovisual production project: Cultural clauses in trade agreements

The organization:

The Canadian Coalition for the Diversity of Cultural Expressions (CDCE) is a non-profit organization that has been the voice of Canada’s cultural community for the past twenty years. Its main mission is to protect and promote the diversity of cultural expressions, both nationally and internationally.

The CDCE brings together 30 organizations representing the entire cultural chain, from creation to dissemination, in the fields of film, television, music, books, new media and the performing arts.

The CDCE works mainly to ensure that cultural goods and services are excluded from trade negotiations and that the diversity of cultural expressions is present in the digital environment.

The CDCE monitors the implementation of the Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions adopted at UNESCO in 2005 and acts to give it full force of application at the national level.

At the international level, the CDCE provides the secretariat of the International Federation of Coalitions for Cultural Diversity (IFCCD), which is made up of some thirty coalitions operating on five continents.

The project:

The project consists of three filmed interviews and a final video which, using the best extracts from the interviews, should make civil society aware of the importance of cultural clauses in trade agreements and equip it in its representations to governments engaged in trade negotiations.

Format

– Three separate 15-20 minute interviews, each serving as the basis for a separate video

– A 5-minute main video with excerpts from each interview

– Subtitling in French for interviews in English, in English for interviews in French

– Conducting the interview = 3 possibilities:

by a representative of the CDCE, dialogue format, two people filmed
by a CDCE representative, questions cut off during editing, only the interviewee is filmed
by the video director, questions cut off during the editing, only the interviewee is filmed

Target audiences

The final video is to be used by IFCCD members, cultural communities and civil society in general, on all continents and in a wider number of countries, to raise awareness among society of the need to protect culture in free trade agreements. It must give cultural associations and organizations the tools and arguments to challenge their governments to take into account the importance of protecting national and local culture when negotiating free trade agreements.

Interview Locations

In Montreal, and possibly Quebec City and Ottawa, depending on the availability of stakeholders.

Calendar

– Application until March 15

– Meeting with the CDCE team

– Conduct of the three interviews between 18 and 28 March

– Assembly from 28 March to 15 April

– First version issued on April 15

– Final version on April 18

Remuneration

To be defined with the CDEC team according to the budget allocated to the project.

The production will be the subject of an audiovisual production contract (transfer of copyright) between the director and CDEC.

CDEC will make non-commercial use of the videos.

Diffusion

The videos will be broadcast online on all CDEC and IFCCD networks. The terms of the broadcast will be specified in the production contract.

Apply:

Application until March 15

Send a CV and examples of achievements to the following address:

cdedianous@cdc-ccd.org

IFCCD 2019 Report on Civil Society Activities

IFCCD members actively participated in the preparation of the report of civil society organizations, submitted in December 2017. On occasion, a questionnaire collected contributions from about 70 civil society organizations in the fall of 2017.

Barely a year later, the IFCCD considers that this report is still relevant. Moreover, since the IFCCD adopted an ambitious action plan at the Montreal Congress in October 2018, and given the tight deadlines for the production of the 2019 report, this report is intended to complement the 2017 report and to complement rather than replace the recommendations already made.

It should also be noted that to date, there has been no formal response to the thirteen key recommendations of the first report. Nor is there a process in place for feedback from the parties, which we will discuss later.

In this IFCCD report, we will focus on topics that were not specifically recommended in the 2017 report. We will also revisit the recommendations of the 2017 report on topics that are priorities for the IFCCD and its members.

READ THE REPORT

Twelfth session of the Intergovernmental Committee

The Intergovernmental Committee of the 2005 Convention for the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions met at UNESCO HQ from 11 to 14 December 2018. Several members of the IFCCD were present.

During its 12th session, the Committee adopted revisions to the operational guidelines on Article 9 (“Information sharing and transparency”), including the framework for Quadrennial Periodic Reports. The purpose of this revision is to harmonize the periodic reporting framework with the monitoring framework of the 2005 Convention. The Committee also approved a roadmap to implement the operational guidelines concerning the Convention in the digital environment and the new projects to be financed under the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD). It discussed a stakeholder outreach strategy for the 2005 Convention and finalized its report on activities to be presented to the seventh session of the Conference of Parties.

A new series of public talks entitled Create|2030 was launched in the framework of the Committee in order to align its debates with the 2030 Agenda on Sustainable Development Goals. This year four Create|2030 Talks were organized:

  • SDG 5: “You Are Next. Empowering women in the digital arts” (11 December, 3pm)
  • SDG 8: “Artificial intelligence: a new working environment for creators” (13 December, 10am)
  • SDG 16: “What is artistic freedom to you?” (13 December, 3pm)
  • SDG 17: “Civil Society:  a partner for change in the governance of culture” (14 December, 10am)

5th Congress of the IFCCD

The International Federation of Coalitions for Cultural Diversity (IFCCD) met in Montreal for its fifth international congress on October 26 and 27, 2018.

Founded on 19 September 2007 in Seville, Spain, the IFCCD is the voice of cultural professionals around the world. Its member coalitions represent creators, artists, independent producers, distributors, broadcasters and publishers in the book, film, television, music, performing arts and visual arts sectors.

Since its foundation in Seville, the Federation has held its international congress in Salvador de Bahia (Brazil) in 2009, Bratislava (Slovakia) in 2012, Mons (Belgium) in 2015. This year, Canada hosted the event, which brought together eighteen delegates on site and four remotely. Nineteen countries were represented: Cameroon, Gabon, Mali, Niger, Uganda, Senegal, Chad, Togo (Africa), Argentina, Canada, Chile, Mexico, Paraguay (Americas), Australia (Asia-Pacific), Belgium, France, Slovakia, Switzerland (Europe), Uganda and United Kingdom.

What to remember from the Montreal Congress

The IFCCD had experienced a slowdown in its activity since the Mons Congress in 2015, its secretariat having been vacant for almost two years. Organized to relaunch the IFCCD’s work, the Montreal Congress provided many avenues for reflection and work for the coming years.

During the first day, IFCCD members discussed the composition of the organization, its means of action, the possibilities of supporting national coalitions and their necessary re-mobilization at the regional level around targeted actions. They also expressed their wish to rebuild the relationship with the UNESCO Secretariat and to get involved in the activities surrounding the Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions.

During a round table discussion, everyone presented the challenges of cultural diversity in their country, developments since the ratification of the UNESCO Convention, progress, obstacles and the current situation of each coalition.

South America, which was particularly mobilized at the time of the adoption of the Convention, has experienced political changes that have marked the cultural sector and weakened the coalitions that have been in place in recent years. The lack of resources complicates coordination between civil society organizations in the field of culture. Nevertheless, IFCCD members are taking every opportunity to participate in legislative reviews or to establish, as in Chile, a national day for cultural diversity.

In Africa, the situation is also very much linked to the political context of each country. For many, the challenge is to depoliticize culture. There is a lack of resources in the region but also a problem with the management of funds, which are not always allocated properly. The discussions also revealed that the Convention is largely unknown in most countries and that governments must be made aware of the importance of cultural exemption clauses in trade treaties.

The situation in Asia-Pacific, which was poorly represented at this congress, made it possible to present the problems related to authoritarian regimes and the issues of freedom of expression that affect many artists. The territorial and linguistic challenge makes joint action difficult, but several organizations maintain a certain dynamism and activity in their countries.

In Europe, the focus is on strengthening national coalitions for better networking. As in Canada, the development of digital technology and its impact on culture are at the heart of general concerns. Coalitions are also mobilizing to recognize the specificity of cultural goods and services in trade agreements.

A dialogue with representatives of the governments of Quebec and Canada

The congress continued in the presence of representatives of the Canadian and Quebec governments, who came to meet the members of the IFCCD.

The Government of Quebec has identified three main priorities regarding the diversity of cultural expressions: the implementation of the UNESCO Convention in the digital context, the challenges of international trade, and international cooperation, in particular through UNESCO’s International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD).

The presence of Canadian government officials opened a discussion on maintaining the cultural exemption in the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada free trade agreement. The France-Canada declaration on cultural diversity and the digital space was also mentioned.

The exchange highlighted that government support for the CDCE and the work of the IFCCD is valuable and extremely beneficial for all organizations around the world, and should be an example to be followed in other countries.

Finally, this exchange was also an opportunity to discuss the mobility of artists and the means to be implemented to improve their circulation.

Working with the research community

Researchers were invited to join delegates to provide input on the second day of the conference. Véronique Guèvremont, of the UNESCO Chair on the Diversity of Cultural Expressions, presented the Study on International Cooperation with French-speaking African Countries for the Implementation of the Convention on the Diversity of Cultural Expressions in the Digital Environment, commissioned by the Ministry of Culture and Communications of Quebec and conducted in five African countries: Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Mali and Senegal.

Destiny Tchéhouali, a researcher at the Centre d’études sur l’intégration et la mondialisation (CEIM – Université du Québec à Montréal) then discussed his work with the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie, in relation to international Internet governance and the diversity of cultural expressions in the digital age.

The discussion continued on the importance of collaboration with researchers, in particular on information sharing (statistical data, national reports) and the bridges to be built between the IFCCD and the various UNESCO Chairs, the academic community and networks such as the International Network of Jurists for the Diversity of Cultural Expressions.

The IFCCD members then summarized their priorities and defined several working areas and projects for the year 2018-2019.

The Congress ended with the election of the Board of Directors, which maintained the current bodies to better prepare for the future. The next IFCCD Congress will be held in an African country in the fall of 2019.